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Navajo code talkers
Navajo men used their language as a code to communicate with others during WWII.

They were a small band of warriors who created an unbreakable code from the ancient

language of their people and changed the course of modern history. The idea of using Navajo as code in World War II came from a veteran of World War I, Philip Johnston. Johnston, knowledgeable in the use of Native American languages during the First World War, knew of the military's search for a code that would withstand all attempts to decipher it. He was also the son of a missionary, raised on the Navajo reservation, spoke fluent Navajo. He believed Navajo answered the military requirement for an undecipherable code as it was an unwritten language of extreme complexity. After an impressive demonstration, the Marine Corps called upon the Navajo Nation to support the military effort by recruiting and enlisting Navajo men to serve as Marine Corps Radio Operators.

Who were they?Edit

They were young Navajo men who transmitted secret communications on the battlefields of WWII. At a time when America's best cryptographers were falling short, these modest sheepherders and farmers were able to fashion the most ingenious and successful code in military history. They drew upon their proud warrior tradition to brave the dense jungles of Guadalcanal and the exposed beachheads of Iwo Jima. Serving with distinction in every major engagement of the Pacific theater from 1942-1945, their unbreakable code played a pivotal role in saving countless lives and hastening the war's end.


The CodeEdit

The code they created at Camp Pendleton was very effective. It originated as approximately 200 terms—growing to over 600 by war's end—and could communicate in 20 seconds what took coding machines of the time 30 minutes to do. It consisted of native terms that were associated with the respective military terms they resembled. For example, the Navajo word for turtle meant "tank," and a dive-bomber was a "chicken hawk." To supplement those terms, words could be spelled out using Navajo terms assigned to individual letters of the alphabet—the selection of the Navajo term being based on the first letter of the Navajo word's English meaning. For instance, "Wo-La-Chee" means "ant," and would represent the letter "A". In this way the Navajo Code Talkers could quickly and concisely communicate with each other in a manner uninitiated Navajos could not understand.


http://www.navajocodetalkers.org/code_talker_story/


The AlphabetsEdit

  • ALPHABET NAVAJO WORD LITERAL TRANSLATION


  1. 1. A WOL-LA-CHEE ANT
  2. 2. A BE-LA-SANA APPLE
  3. 3. A TSE-NILL AXE
  4. 4. B NA-HASH-CHID BADGER
  5. 5. B SHUSH BEAR
  6. 6. B TOISH-JEH BARREL
  7. 7. C MOASI CAT
  8. 8. C TLA-GIN COAL
  9. 9. C BA-GOSHI COW
  10. 10. D BE DEER
  11. 11. D CHINDI DEVIL
  12. 12. D LHA-CHA-EH DOG
  13. 13. E AH-JAH EAR
  14. 14. E DZEH ELK
  15. 15. E AH-NAH EYE
  16. 16. F CHUO FIR
  17. 17. F TSA-E-DONIN-EE FLY
  18. 18. F MA-E FOX
  19. 19. G AH-TAD GIRL
  20. 20. G KLIZZIE GOAT
  21. 21. G JEHA GUM
  22. 22. H TSE-GAH HAIR
  23. 23. H CHA HAT
  24. 24. H LIN HORSE
  25. 25. I TKIN ICE
  26. 26. I YEH-HES ITCH
  27. 27. I A-CHI INTESTINE
  28. 28. J TKELE-CHO-G JACKASS
  29. 29. J AH-YA-TSINNE JAW
  30. 30. J YIL-DOI JERK
  31. 31. K JAD-HO-LONI KETTLE
  32. 32. K BA-AH-NE-DI-TININ KEY
  33. 33. K KLIZZIE-YAZZIE KID
  34. 34. L DIBEH-YAZZIE LAMB
  35. 35. L AH-JAD LEG
  36. 36. L NASH-DOIE-TSO LION
  37. 37. M TSIN-TLITI MATCH
  38. 38. M BE-TAS-TNI MIRROR
  39. 39. M NA-AS-TSO-SI MOUSE
  40. 40. N TSAH NEEDLE
  41. 41. N A-CHIN NOSE
  42. 42. O A-KHA OIL
  43. 43. O TLO-CHIN ONION
  44. 44. O NE-AHS-JAH OWL
  45. 45. P CLA-GI-AIH PANT
  46. 46. P BI-SO-DIH PIG
  47. 47. P NE-ZHONI PRETTY
  48. 48. Q CA-YEILTH QUIVER
  49. 49. R GAH RABBIT
  50. 50. R DAH-NES-TSA RAM
  51. 51. R AH-LOSZ RICE
  52. 52. S DIBEH SHEEP
  53. 53. S KLESH SNAKE
  54. 54. T D-AH TEA
  55. 55. T A-WOH TOOTH
  56. 56. T THAN-ZIE TURKEY
  57. 57. U SHI-DA UNCLE
  58. 58. U NO-DA-IH UTE
  59. 59. V A-KEH-DI-GLINI VICTOR
  60. 60. W GLOE-IH WEASEL
  61. 61. X AL-NA-AS-DZOH CROSS
  62. 62. Y TSAH-AS-ZIH YUCCA
  63. 63. Z BESH-DO-TLIZ ZINC


http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq61-4.htm



PhotosEdit

http://www.navajocodetalkers.org/photos/ ==

Awarde ==

Since World War II in 1939, the Navajo Code Talkers were finally awarded with a medal in 2001. After all the cruelty and sufferings the Native Americans, in more content the Navajos, went through with the government they still helped and were ready when called for duty.